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A Question regarding Gurpurab Siri Guru Dasmesh jee

Posted by Kulbir Singh 
Traditionally the Gurpurab date for Siri Guru Gobind Singh jee Maharaj is Poh Sudi Saptami but this year the date, according to the Bikrami Calender is on Maagh 6 (Jan 18). Same thing with Siri Guru Nanak Dev jee's Gurpurab last year. Instead of Kattak Pooranmaashi, it fell on Maghar. Is it because they added an extra month to reconcile to the solar calender or there is some other reason?

Sudi and Vadi are periods of rising and waning moon. The first day after Puniya (Poornmashi or full moon) begins the month and is called Ekam Vadi till the Chaudas Vadi after which there is no moon (Masiya or Amavasiya). Then starts the Sudi period till the Puniya again.

So Poh Sudi Saptami would have fallen more than couple of weeks ago. It would be great if someone can clarify this.

Kulbir Singh
Please use english terms. I hardly have any idea about what you're saying.

Regarding the birth date of Dasmesh Pita ji Maharaj, no one can be so sure about exactly what date of what month Sri Guru Gobind Singh Ji took avataar. Main thing is that the Sikhs remain in the habit of remembering and celebrating Guru-purabs, it is fine. I don't think Guru Sahib Ji looks at such minor mistakes.

If we Sikhs start wrangling over such stuff, we are only hurting and weakening ourselves!

Sat Kartar! Rab Rakha!

Daas
yeah if someone could clarify this it would be great!
Vahiguru Jee ka Khalsa Vahiguru jee kee fateh ji,

Myself also was dealing with the same confusion and it wasn't pleasant celebration. After the long battle of thoughts, I approached a Gurmukh Piyare.
The answer I had was just amazing and more than satisfaction!

He said "ਨਾਨਕਸ਼ਾਹੀ ਕੈਲੰਡਰ ਪੰਡਿਤਾ ਦੀ ਸੋਚ ਦੀ ਨਕਲ ਹੈ ਇਸ ਤਰਾ ਤਾਂ ਪੰਡਿਤਾ ਵਿਚ ਹੁੰਦਾ ਹੈI ਤੇ ਦਸ਼ਮੇਸ਼ ਜੀ ਨੇ ਤਾਂ ਸਾਫ਼ ਕਿਹਾ ਹੈ ਕਿ ਗੁਰਸਿਖ ਨੇ ਪੰਡਿਤ ਨਹੀ ਬਣਨਾ

ਬਾਕੀ ਗੁਰਪੁਰਬ ਤਾਂ ਸ਼ਰਧਾ ਵਾਲੇ ਗੁਰਸਿਖ ਹਰ ਰੋਜ਼ ਹੀ ਮਨਾ ਸਕਦੇ ਹਨI ਕਿਸੇ ਖਾਸ ਦਿਨ ਜਾ ਮਿਤੀ ਦਾ ਸੋਦਾ ਨਹੀ ਹੈ ਜਿਸ ਦਿਨ ਮਨਾ ਲਿਆ ਓਸ ਦਿਨ ਹੀ ਫਲ ਮਿਲ ਜਾਣਾ ਹੈI He was in favor of Jan 5,but, Day end he just means to celebrate it regardless of Day/night,anytime no matter.


and I realized that he is totally correct Do we need a specific date to celebrate the Gurpurb and If your in love with Deshmesh ji then he will accept your effort no matter what day you remember him! as soon as your focused on Naam instead of "day",

ਪਿਆਰ ਹਿਸਾਬ ਕਿਤਾਬ ਤੇ ਤਾਰੀਖਾ ਦਾ ਮੁਹਤਾਜ ਨਹੀ ਹੈ

ਜੋ ਹਰ ਦਿਨ ਈਦ ਮਨਾਤੇ ਹੈ ਆਸ਼ਿਕ਼ ਵੋ ਹੋਤੇ ਹੈ
ਏਕ ਦਿਨ ਈਦ ਮਨਾਕਰ ਇਸ਼ਕ਼ ਕਾ ਦਾਵਾ ਨਹੀ ਕਰਾ ਕਰਤੇ

Please Forgive me if I have offended anyone by post!
Gurmukho it does matter on a number of reasons...

ive tried to find out bhai kulbir singh jee and this is what i have found

You are correct on the definitons of Sudi/Vadhi.

But Desi months can overlap i will show you how..

Poh Sangrand = 15 december (1 poh)
poh poornmashee = 28 December (14 poh)
This is where it gets interesting Maagh Sangrand = 13 January
Poh Massya = 11th January (28 Poh)
and if sudi saptmee is 7 days later it makes gurpurb jan 18th but your right this is also maagh 6
Great input so far ..

However if :

ਨਾਨਕਸ਼ਾਹੀ ਕੈਲੰਡਰ ਪੰਡਿਤਾ ਦੀ ਸੋਚ ਦੀ ਨਕਲ ਹੈ ਇਸ ਤਰਾ ਤਾਂ ਪੰਡਿਤਾ ਵਿਚ ਹੁੰਦਾ ਹੈI ਤੇ ਦਸ਼ਮੇਸ਼ ਜੀ ਨੇ ਤਾਂ ਸਾਫ਼ ਕਿਹਾ ਹੈ ਕਿ ਗੁਰਸਿਖ ਨੇ ਪੰਡਿਤ ਨਹੀ ਬਣਨਾ

ਬਾਕੀ ਗੁਰਪੁਰਬ ਤਾਂ ਸ਼ਰਧਾ ਵਾਲੇ ਗੁਰਸਿਖ ਹਰ ਰੋਜ਼ ਹੀ ਮਨਾ ਸਕਦੇ ਹਨI ਕਿਸੇ ਖਾਸ ਦਿਨ ਜਾ ਮਿਤੀ ਦਾ ਸੋਦਾ ਨਹੀ ਹੈ ਜਿਸ ਦਿਨ ਮਨਾ ਲਿਆ ਓਸ ਦਿਨ ਹੀ ਫਲ ਮਿਲ ਜਾਣਾ ਹੈI


Then why can the Sikhs pick one day and stick to it worldwide instead of being stuck in Bhamanvaad.
The first day after Puniya (Poornmashi or full moon) begins the month and is called Ekam Vadi till the Chaudas Vadi after which there is no moon (Masiya or Amavasiya). Then starts the Sudi period till the Puniya again.

Veer Ji, above is from your post. The bold part seems to be incorrect. The first of month or SAGRAND is not day after Full moon.Ekam Vadi is not SANGRAD.

Further, I am quoting a part from an article on this website.

ਹਰ ਦਿਨ ਤਿੰਨ ਤਰੀਖਾਂ ਹੁੰਦੀਆਂ ਹਨ ਜਿਵੇੇ ਕੇ ਗੁਰੂ ਗੋਬਿੰਦ ਸਿੰਘ ਜੀ ਦਾ ਪ੍ਰਕਾਸ਼ 23 ਪੋਹ, ਪੋਹ ਸੁਦੀ 7 ਅਤੇ 22 ਦਸੰਬਰ ਨੂੰ ਹੋਇਆ ਸੀ। ਹੁਣ ਇਹ ਤਿੰਨ ਤਰੀਖਾਂ ਕਦੇ ਵੀ ਇਸ ਤਰਾਂ ਇਕੱਠੀਆਂ ਨਹੀਂ ਆਉਣਗੀਆਂ।

It seems you are confusing 23 POH with POH SUDI SAPTAMI.
WJKK WJKF

Daas took the liberty of emailing Pal Singh Purewal (creator of the Nanakshahi Calender) for Bhai Kulbir Singh's query. His response:

"Yes, because in 2012 there were two months named Bhadon making 13 months in the lunar calender. This pushed all lunar dates by 19 days in the Gregorian calender.

This happens after every two-three years."


WJKK WJKF
Quote

Veer Ji, above is from your post. The bold part seems to be incorrect. The first of month or SAGRAND is not day after Full moon.Ekam Vadi is not SANGRAD.

In pure Lunar calender Ekam Vadi is Sangrand but the Bikrami calender is not a pure Lunar calender. The months in this calender change according to the movement of the sun.

Thanks for the response from Sardar Pal Singh Purewal.

Kulbir Singh
Indian Calendar - An Introduction

The Western calendar is based on the sun, in which a year is the time required for the earth to complete one orbit around the sun. This precisely measures 365 days 5 hours 48 minutes and 46 seconds.


The Indian calender is ingeniously based on both the sun and the moon; it uses a solar year but divides it into 12 lunar months. A lunar month is precisely 29 days 12 hours 44 minutes and 3 seconds long. Twelve such months constitute a lunar year of 354 days 8 hours 48 minutes and 36 seconds. To help the lunar months coincide with the solar year, the practice of inserting an intercalary (extra) month arose. So 60 solar months = 62 lunar months. Hence an extra month, called the Adhik Mas, is inserted every 30 months i.e. every 2 ½ years.

Lunar days in the Indian calendar are called tithis. They are calculated using the difference of the longitudinal angle between the position of the sun and moon. Because of this, tithis may vary in length. Consequently, the tithi may or may not have changed by the time the day has changed at sunrise. And that is why we find at certain times a tithi being omitted, and at certain times, two consecutive days sharing the same tithi.

In the Indian calendar, seasons follow the sun; months follow the moon; and days, both the sun and the moon. The era in the Indian calendar is called the Vikram Era, or the Vikram Samvat, which began in 57 BCE. To calculate the corresponding year of the Common Era, 57 years should be subtracted from the Indian year if the date falls between the beginning of the Indian year and the end of the Western year i.e. between Kartak sud 1 and 31 December. If the date falls between the beginning of the Western year and the end of the Indian year i.e. between 1 January and Aso vad 30, then only 56 years should be subtracted.

(http://www.swaminarayan.org/calendar/index2012.htm)
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